Health and MedicineMedicinesList of drugs that Social Security will not pay for

List of drugs that Social Security will not pay for

Medicines that will no longer be financed by Social Security: find out which medicines will no longer be financed by the Health System.

Just a few weeks ago, the Ministry of Health announced that it was going to stop financing a total of 425 medicines, a figure that was announced on July 30 and whose objective is none other than to save some 458 million euros per year, to guarantee with this –always according to Health- the “sustainability” of the Health System.

Today the Official State Gazette (BOE) has been published with the list of more than 417 medicines that will no longer be financed by Social Security, and which, it seems, could be reviewed periodically.

This means that, as of September 1, 2012, patients will have to pay the price of some drugs in full.

Among the most popular medications we find well-known drugs such as Forties (antidiarrheal), Alma (antacid), or Duphalac (laxative), as well as cough syrups (such as Mucosa or Petcock) or ointments to relieve pain caused by arthritis.

Reasons why drugs will no longer be funded

The BOE has included the different reasons why medicines are excluded from the provision of the National Health System:

  1. A) Establishment of selected prices.
  2. B) Coexistence with an over-the-counter medication with which it shares the active ingredient and dose.
  3. C) The consideration of medication as advertising.
  4. D) That the active ingredient has a favorable safety and efficacy profile documented through extensive use and years of experience.
  5. E) Because they are indicated in the treatment of minor symptoms.
  6. F) For meeting any of the non-inclusion criteria contained in section 2 of article 89 of Law 29/2006.

From what day will they stop being financed?

The medicines indicated in the following table will no longer be financed by the Health System as of September 1, 2012, despite the fact that the BOE resolution was published on August 17, 2012.

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