Nutrition and DietFunctions of insoluble fiber and rich foods

Functions of insoluble fiber and rich foods

Learn about the main functions of insoluble fiber, its benefits and which the foods richest in insoluble fiber are.

Like we talked about the existence of two types of constipation (atonic constipation, caused by a lower motor capacity of the colon, and spastic constipation, caused by emotions), we must also talk about the existence of two types of fibers: insoluble fiber and soluble fiber.

Of course, first we must know what we mean medically by constipation: it consists of the retention of fecal matter beyond the physiological evacuation time, which can be up to 48 hours or at least three times a week.

From a nutritional point of view, fiber is a complex carbohydrate, which means that our digestive system tends to digest it more slowly, not increasing blood sugar levels abruptly.  In addition, they have the ability to increase the becalm bolus, stimulating intestinal motility.

The insoluble fiber (also known as the non – soluble fiber) is a fiber type formed by different substances capable to retain little water, hence it is a fiber swell little. Its functions -as we will see- are very important, since it helps to clean the walls of the intestine, increases the volume of stool and eliminates waste adhering to the intestine.

Main functions of insoluble fiber

  • Improves and facilitates the movement of the digestive tract.
  • It retains water.
  • Produces satiety, reducing appetite and the feeling of hunger.
  • Increases the volume of stool.
  • Prevents diverticulosis and colon cancer.
  • Avoid the entry of toxic substances.
  • It renews the bacterial flora.
  • Prevents and avoids hemorrhoids.

Insoluble Fiber Rich Foods

If you want to increase your consumption of foods rich in insoluble fiber, we advise you to choose the following:

  • Fruits: strawberry, peach, banana, pear, pineapple and kiwi.
  • Vegetables and vegetables: cabbages (broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and cabbage), chard, spinach, arugula, chicory, lettuce, watercress.
  • Nuts: almonds, chestnuts, peanuts (peanuts) and walnuts.
  • Tubers: potato, sweet potato and cassava.
  • Legumes: beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils.
  • Grains and cereals: whole wheat flour, whole wheat bread and whole wheat pasta.
  • Seeds: sesame and flax.

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