Nutrition and DietAspartic acid: non-essential amino acid

Aspartic acid: non-essential amino acid

Aspartic acid: what it is, functions, rich foods, consequences of its lack and contraindications of aspartic acid, a very important non-essential amino acid?

The amino acids are essential to the proper functioning of our body because certain functions essential for our health. They are organic compounds that contain an amino  group and a carboxyl group, which our body can synthesize to build new proteins.

They are divided, as you know, into essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids. The first are those that our body is not able to synthesize, so that the only way to provide them is through diet. However, the latter (non-essential amino acids) can be synthesized by our body.

The aspartic acid is a nonessential amino acid that participates in certain basic functions in our body.

What is aspartic acid?

The aspartic acid is a nonessential amino acid that, among other things, exerts functions detoxifying the blood system, favoring a proper circulation.

Aspartic acid functions

  • Detoxifying action of the blood system.
  • Promotes proper blood circulation.
  • It helps in the elimination of toxins, through the liver and kidneys.
  • Increases resistance, helping in case of depression, tiredness or chronic fatigue.
  • Rejuvenates cellular activity.
  • It helps in the formation of cells, and in the functioning of the metabolism.

Health benefits of aspartic acid

Aspartic acid, as we briefly indicated in the section dedicated to the different functions of aspartic acid, is a non-essential amino acid essential for proper blood circulation, by helping to improve it.

In addition, through both the liver and the kidneys they help eliminate toxins that accumulate in our body. In addition, it is a non-essential amino acid that protects the liver.

It is also essential in cell formation, helping in a positive way to rejuvenate cell activity.

Where to find aspartic acid?

Here are the foods richest in aspartic acid:

  • Plant-based foods: cereals (corn and oats), legumes (beans, broad beans, chickpeas, and lentils), seeds, vegetables, and nuts.
  • Foods of animal origin: milk and dairy products, meat, fish and eggs.

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